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Elinor Carucci

10/06/2009
by
Eran and I, Closer, 1998

Eran and I, Closer, 1998

Feet Moving on Bed, Closer, 1999

Feet Moving on Bed, Closer, 1999

Love, in Spite, Crisis, 2003

Love, in Spite, Crisis, 2003

 

 

Elinor Carucci uses the camera as an observational tool, both documenting and generating deeply intimate moments between her and her loved ones.   Her work emotes beautifully quiet, genuine moments that serve as a diary of her life.  

By the very fact of documenting, the image competed with its object, showed it in a different, yet not at all false, light. It’s like facing a mirror: when you look into it, you tighten your face muscles slightly, change your expression. I found myself and my family discovering more about ourselves, or at least, discovering nuances we couldn’t otherwise see. Sometimes, the photographs came before I could articulate what it was that triggered them, giving form to some unformed feeling. More than that, the camera sometimes dares say what I don’t dare think. These lines, between what I thought I saw in life, what I saw in the photographs, what I thought I saw in the photographs, became confusing in many ways. Like a permanent double take, I was not always sure if something – a mood, a sigh, a frown – captured an actual event, or if I was imposing on my memory a fraction the camera had caught. It often feels like I have two, parallel sets of memory. And yet, as complicated as the relations between representation and life may be, I do trust the camera, and what it captured is,  in many ways, real.

excerpt from Carucci’s text on Closer

To view more work and personal testimonies, visit Elinor Carucci’s personal site.

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